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Tudor Watches

Brief Brand History for :

In 1926, the Tudor name was trademarked for Hans Wilsdorf by a watchmaker and dealer. Soon after, watches were signed with Tudor. In 1936, Wilsdorf took over the Tudor brand and adopted the rose of the Tudor dynasty and shield as its symbols. The Montres Tudor S.A. Company was founded in 1946. Wilsdorf's idea was to create a watch with the same reliability, quality, and durability as a Rolex but at a lower price point. To do this, he used stock movements and Rolex cases. The Tudor Oyster collection became popular in the '40s, and the self-winding Tudor Oyster Prince was launched in 1952. In that same year, 26 Oyster Princes accompanied the British North Greenland Expedition. The 1950s also saw the introduction of the Oyster Prince Submariner, which Tudor supplied to the French and United States Navies. These Submariners were reinterpreted in the modern Black Bay and Pelagos Collections, debuted in 2012. In recent years, Tudor has quickly risen in popularity due to its use of in-house calibers, phenomenal case finishing, and quality at a reasonable price.

Product Line Overview:

The Black Bay remains the most popular Tudor watch on the market. The Black Bay is available in several variants. The 41 millimeter standard model and the 39 millimeter Black Bay Fifty-Eight are the most recognizable of the collection; their rotating bezels, legible, luminescent dials, and high water resistance make them ideal dive watches. The Black Bay P01 is characterized by a twelve-hour bezel and vintage inspired case shape. The Black Bay Pro and Black Bay GMT both feature GMT complications. The Black Bay Chrono's appeal stems from the watch's clean design and in-house chronograph movement. The Chrono model is also available in bronze, ceramic, and gold. The Black Bay Collection includes several references without rotating bezels in 32, 36, and 41 millimeter sizes. Tudor produces several other sports watches. The Ranger and North Flag, two field watches, pay homage to the 1952 North Greenland Expedition on which several members wore Tudor watches. The Tudor Royal's integrated bracelet, day-date complication, and notched bezel give it a contemporary appearance. The Heritage Chrono stands out for its bold colors, prominent bezel, and contrasting sub-dials. Tudor's "Classic" Collections include the Claire de Rose, an elegant women's watch often set with diamonds. The Glamour is available with date, double date, and day-date displays. The Tudor Style offers an excellent alternative to the Rolex Datejust. The Style is distinguished by a steel bracelet, fluted bezel, and clean dial. The 1926 features a vintage-inspired dial with numerals marking every other hour. The versatile design of the 1926 allows the watch to function as both a dress watch or a timepiece for everyday wear. Tudor's lesser known dive watches include the Pelagos, Pelagos 39, Pelagos FXD, and Pelagos LHD. The design of all Pelagos variants features a unidirectional rotating bezel, snowflake hands, luminescent markers, and satin-brushed case finishing. Most cases are made of titanium. All configurations boast impressive water resistance. The Pelagos, for instance, is water resistant to 500 meters. The Pelagos 39 is differentiated by a smaller case diameter of 39 millimeters (as opposed to 42) and a sunray-brushed bezel. The LHD is equivalent to the Pelagos but possesses a rarely seen left-handed crown. The FXD revives the collaboration between Tudor and the French Navy, retaining many of the specifications the Navy originally requested. Unlike the other Pelagos models, the FXD features fixed strap bars intended for the fabric straps worn in naval use.